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Title: Precision Oral Cancer Medicine - Jennifer R. Grandis, University of California, San Francisco, Professior of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Associate Vice-Chancellor of Clinical and Translational Research, Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Sponsored by Dentsply Sirona

This session will be recorded and available in the IADR/ADR Knowledge Community after the meeting. 

Precision Oral Cancer Medicine Jennifer R. Grandis, University of California, San Francisco, Profession of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Associate Vice-Chancellor of Clinical and Translational Research, Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (Sponsored by Dentsply Sirona)
Precision medicine approaches can help determine effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer (HNC), a group of cancers that disproportionately impact worldwide cancer mortality. Even with increased information about the underlying biology of HNC, patients are still treated with surgeries that are disfiguring and combined chemoradiation approaches that are associated with significant short and long-term morbidities. Aggressive, combined modality therapy, results in 50% of patients succumbing to their initial HNC and the remainder are most likely to die of a second malignancy of the upper aerodigestive tract. Work to date has: 1) helped establish the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a prognostic and therapeutic target in HNC; 2) identified mechanisms of treatment resistance; and 3) unraveled the genomic landscape of human HNC. Each discovery incorporates findings from human HNC samples and mechanistic studies in an expanding suite of relevant preclinical models to facilitate rapid and bi-directional translation between the laboratory and the clinic. The potential of precision medicine is well known; however, despite an increased understanding of the biological underpinnings of human cancers, preventive and/or therapeutic interventions based on precise, prospective measurements are few. Rapid translaton between the laboratory and the clinic to develop predictive biomarkers for head and neck cancers will help develop a paradigm that could reduce mortality from this subset of cancers and fundamentally alter our approach to cancer prevention.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the concept of precision medicine
  • To appreciate the value of window-of-opportunity clinical trials
  • To understand the landscape of mutational testing
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