Description
Presentation Blocks: 03-22-2018 - Thursday - 03:45 PM - 05:00 PM

Title: A Microfluidic Cell Culture Based Platform for Simulating Periodontal Microenvironment

Authors:

Sam Elcik (Presenter)
Roseman University of Health Sciences

Rachana Hegde, Roseman University of Health Sciences
Venkata Yellepeddi, Roseman University of Health Sciences

Abstract:

Objectives: Currently, there are no in-vitro models available that can effectively simulate the periodontal microenvironment and provide an adequate setting to develop new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease. Based on a recent report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one out of every two American adults age 30 and over has periodontal disease. Moreover, 64.7 million (47.2%) American adults have been diagnosed with mild to severe periodontitis. Additionally, the intrinsic complexity of the periodontal microenvironment that includes high GCF turnover (~50 times/hour), low volume of GCF (~0.4┬ÁL), the presence of host-derived enzymes, inflammatory mediators, and tissue breakdown products, confounds the development of new approaches. Therefore, we fabricated a microfluidic chip-based device with chambers containing living cells that are continuously perfused with media to simulate tissue- and organ level-physiology.

Methods: To validate the applicability of a prototype microfluidic chip-based device for simulating the periodontal microenvironment, we cultured primary human gingival keratinocytes (HGK) and seeded them onto the polycarbonate membrane at 1 X 105/cm2 density inside the microfluidic chip. To evaluate viability, cells were stained using a LIVE/DEADTM cell imaging kit and analyzed under a fluorescence microscope.

Results: The results showed that the HGK cells were successfully injected through microchannels without any obstruction and were seeded on the membrane. The fluorescence microscopy images showed that more than 95% of the HGK cells were viable for up to a period 4 hours after seeding on chip membranes and that the cells did not adhere to the walls of the microchannels.

Conclusions: In conclusion, a novel microfluidic-chip based device simulating the periodontal microenvironment was successfully validated for the feasibility of growing HGK cells. The microfluidic-chip device reported in this research can thus be utilized for various applications related to periodontal disease diagnosis, periodontal drug development, and individualization of periodontal therapy.

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